How to Get Started in Free-Machine Embroidery – Part 1

In these posts, I want to share some of, what I consider to be, the main points in my three craft eBooks.

Today I want to talk about free machine embroidery and quote from my book ‘How to Get Started in Free-Machine Embroidery

Lots of people who want to give free machine embroidery a try worry that their sewing machine is not up to the challenge. If you have an older machine with the facility to drop the feed-dogs (the little serrated teeth under the presser foot) – then the chances are that you’re good to go.

Here’s what How to Get Started in Free-Machine Embroidery has to say:

“Basic is Best

Now I may be accused of being old fashioned, but when it comes to sewing machines, for machine embroidery, I have to say that basic is best.

I can speak from experience as I have had a wide range of sewing machines, from the top-of-the-range all-singing-all-dancing, embroidery machine, to the very basic hand-cranked Singer.

Hand crank Singer

The embroidery machine was capable of free embroidery but changing tension was a battle of wills and the least little infraction was greeted with a stall and multi-coloured warning message. The little hand-cranked Singer was willing and able, but two hands are definitely better than one when it comes to free machine embroidery.

I now have a base model Bernina which is a sturdy, uncomplicated workhorse and does everything I need.

Bernina

Machines that are going to be best for machine embroidery need to be quite weighty models. You’re going to be doing a lot of fast sewing and it’s going to be taking a bit of a hammering, so it needs to be quite stable. Unfortunately, this means that a lot of lightweight budget models are not really up to the job.

It would be easy for me to say that any basic sewing machine would be fine for machine embroidery – but that wouldn’t be true and, as I want you to get the most out of this book, and your introduction to free machine embroidery, I want to be honest with you – right from the start.

In my opinion, sewing machines which have a vertically-loaded bobbin and are strongly built, with a metal frame, are best for machine embroidery. It is no coincidence that so many well-known free machine embroiderers swear by older or industrial-style machines for their work. There are also many people who prefer the original Singer treadle machines for their embroidery. I have one myself, but I am thinking about getting it converted to electricity. Its current mode of operation may be a great workout for the legs, but starting and stopping takes quite a bit of practice.

The Clean Machine

I’ll be giving you a taste of ‘How to Get Started in Machine Embroidery’ in these posts but if you’d like to treat yourself to the full version, here’s the link:

http://www.amazon.com/How-Get-Started-Free-Machine-Embroidery-ebook/dp/B00HHCTPW8

If you’d like to be in with a chance of winning a free download of the book, here’s all you have to do:

  • Comment on this post
  • Like my Facebook Page at www.facebook.com/pages/Margo-Price-Author/1400866683481343
  • Share this post on Twitter

The winner will be drawn on Tuesday 4th January. Good luck!

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