How to Get Started in Machine Embroidery – What threads to Use

On some of the sewing and embroidery pages I follow, there have recently been questions and comments on the best thread to use for machine embroidery.

Those of us who sew a lot probably have lots of conflicting opinions on this but, just for the record – here’s mine!

The Importance of Good Thread

Thread is very important. It’s particularly important in free-machine embroidery. When you’re moving that fast, and once you get the hang of it you will be going pretty fast, the thread will reeling out very quickly and the least little problem with the thread, is going to cause it to break. And that’s a real pain. So if you’re going to buy thread for machine embroidery, make sure it’s the best you can afford.

Use Good Threads

Use Good Threads

What Not to Use

Your Sewing Box Inheritance

Lots of us have been left sewing boxes by aunties or grandmas. We have become known as the stitcher in the family and they very kindly leave us their sewing box. It’s usually quite old, lots of reels of threads, bits and pieces, some useful, some not so. The trouble is with old threads is they tend to become flattened on the reel and, if you use them on your machine, they’re not going to run very smoothly. The quality is not going to match that of modern threads and they are likely to snap. So I would suggest that you keep these old threads for hand sewing. As you can imagine, I’ve upset a few people by telling them this. Being left something as personal as a sewing box can be very meaningful and hold lots of memories but, unlike antique furniture, wine and paintings, thread does not improve with age. So be kind to yourself and your machine and use a good modern thread.

Threads from Auction Sites

You’ve probably been on some popular auction sites and seen machine embroidery ‘silk’ from Thailand or somewhere in the Far East. It’s usually very cheap. But there’s a reason for that. I’ve tried them myself, from several different vendors, but at anything other than a snail’s pace, they snap, shred and leave you thoroughly fed up. It’s really not worth it, save yourself the pain and get something decent.

three threads

Bargain Basement

Buying bargain threads from markets, car boot sales, the post office (unless it is also a haberdashery as my local one is) or the corner shop is also a potential road to disaster. Remember at all times, they’re cheap for a reason. And the way to tell if a thread is really no good is to unwind a short length from the reel, hold it up to the light and, if it’s a bit fluffy or hairy, reject it as that fluff is going to clog up your needle and ultimately, your machine.

Types of Threads

Threads are gauged generally by their thickness. Some manufacturers (I use Madeira but there are many other good brands) indicate thickness by numbers. The higher the number – the thinner the thread. The profile of the thread is also important. Now the profile of a thread can be seen if you snip a bit off the end and look at the thread end on. Standard all purpose polyester threads have a round profile. They generally have a have a dull appearance, on the reel, as when light hits them it is scattered in all directions and very little is reflected back to your eye. Rayon machine embroidery thread has a flat profile and so reflects a lot of light back to your eye, making it look shiny.
Obviously even the best threads will shred or snap occasionally but you can lessen the chances of that happening by buying something good.

So What Threads Do I Recommend?

All I ever use is three types:
• a standard all purpose polyester for general sewing and for bobbin filling when machine embroidering.
• a good quality rayon thread for embroidery.
• a 100% cotton quilting thread for embroidering on quilts and throws.

This is an excerpt from my craft eBook ‘How to Make a Living From Crafts’. If you’re interested in getting the whole book, here’s the link:

http://www.amazon.com/How-Get-Started-Free-Machine-Embroidery-ebook/dp/B00HHCTPW8/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1393270037&sr=1-1&keywords=free+machine+embroidery

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